Toronto’s Union Station

“Union Station is an integral part of Toronto’s past, present and future. Some memories are fond; some are sad; many are exhilarating. Memories of Union Station remind us about who we are as a people, and as a city.” [1] Buildings are more than devices or mechanisms for human desideratum and indulgence. They provide a physical fragment of history as a symbolic marker in a particular period in time.

Toronto’s Union Station is one of the introductions of expansion of travels and the future for the cities growth and activity. Originally, there for two former stations built before the current Union Station was establish. The current station is a rectilinear building, primarily located on 61 Front Street West, bounded by Bay, Front and York Street. The structure is designed by a number of architects collaborating on the Union Station design: the Montreal Firm of G.A. Ross and R.H. Macdonald, Hugh Jones of the CPR and John M. Lyle of Toronto. [2]

Union Station is done in a Beaux-Art style. The exterior facade is composted of smooth beige Indiana and Queenston limestone. The most striking feature of the station are the forty foot tall free standing Roman Tuscan columns, weighing in around 75 tons, that emphasizes the entrance. The station follows through its language to its interior. A few steps from the main entrance doors, it opens up to this grand decorative hall, informally know as the Great Hall. The hall is 76 metres long and at its highest point it is 27 metre tall. The first striking feature is the coffered vault ceiling of Gustavino tiles. [3]

In addition, the flourishing city required the station to adopt to its continuos growth of population and the inevitable renovation of the structure as it slowly deteriorate. It is still entails its original purpose as a thriving train station for thousands of commuters each day. Through it aesthetic design, it is quite elegant, impressive organism.

References

[1] “Part 1- Vision.” TORONTO. 2010. Web. 8 Oct. 2010. <http://www.toronto.ca/union_station/pdf/part1.pdf>.

[2] “Union Station – History.” TORONTO. City of Toronto, 1998-2010. Web. 4 Oct. 2010. <http://www.toronto.ca/>.

[3] “Wiki: Union Station (Toronto).” Wapedia. 2010. Web. 2 Oct. 2010. <http://wapedia.mobi/en/Union_Station_(Toronto)>.

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